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Q fever bacteria

Q fever is caused by the bacterium Coxiella burnetii, commonly found in sheep, goats and cattle. The bacterium can also infect pets, including cats, dogs and rabbits. These animals transmit the bacteria through their urine, feces, milk and birthing products — such as the placenta and amniotic fluid Q fever is a zoonotic infectious disease caused by the Coxiella burnetii bacterium. It is an obligate intracellular pathogen with a high infection capacity that proliferates exclusively in an acidified medium, forming a lysosome-like vacuole. It presents a peculiar phenomenon called antigeni C. burnetii, the bacteria that causes Q fever, has been described as a potential bioterrorism agent. C. burnetii is a select agent subject to the select agent regulations found in 42 CFR Part 73. C. burnetii is a highly infectious agent, in some cases requiring less than 10 bacteria to make you sick

Q fever - Symptoms and causes - Mayo Clini

A very small percentage of people (less than 5 out of 100) who become infected with C. burnetii bacteria develop a more serious infection called chronic Q fever. Chronic Q fever develops months or years following initial Q fever infection. People with chronic Q fever often develop an infection of one or more heart valves (called endocarditis) Q fever is a bacterial infection that can cause a severe flu-like illness. For some people, Q fever can affect their health and ability to work for many years. The bacteria are spread from animals, mainly cattle, sheep and goats. Even people who do not have contact with animals may be infected Q fever or query fever is a disease caused by infection with Coxiella burnetii, a bacterium that affects humans and other animals. This organism is uncommon, but may be found in cattle, sheep, goats, and other domestic mammals, including cats and dogs.The infection results from inhalation of a spore-like small-cell variant, and from contact with the milk, urine, feces, vaginal mucus, or semen. Q fever is an infectious disease that is spread by the inhalation or ingestion of a bacterium known as Coxiella burnetii, which belongs to the order of Legionellales. C. burnetii is spread mainly by breathing contaminated air or eating or drinking a contaminated food

Q fever, also called query fever, is a bacterial infection caused by the bacteria Coxiella burnetii.The bacteria are most commonly found in cattle, sheep, and goats around the world Q fever is caused by infection with the bacteria Coxiella burnetii. Cattle, sheep, and goats are commonly infected and people often become exposed by breathing in dust contaminated with infected animal body fluids. People in direct contact with animals during birthing, such as veterinarians and farmers, may be at higher risk for infection Q fever is a disease with acute and chronic presentations caused by the bacterium Coxiella burnetii. Cattle, sheep, and goats are the primary reservoirs, although a variety of species may be infected

Q Fever (Coxiella Burnetii

Transmission Q Fever CD

Signs and Symptoms Q Fever CD

Q fever is not always a serious illness in immunocompetent individuals, and in some cases it is asymptomatic. Symptoms of Q fever resemble those of the flu. It can also lead to a mild form of pneumonia if the bacteria was contracted through inhalation Q fever is a widespread zoonosis, and humans are incidental hosts. The reservoir includes mammals, birds, and arthropods (mainly ticks).1 The most commonly identified sources of human infection are farm animals, notably goats, and sheep. Infected mammals shed C. burnetii in urine, feces, milk, and birth products, in particular Q fever is a zoonotic infection caused by the pathogen Coxiella burnetii, and patients can present with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations [ 1 ]. The designation Q fever (from Query) was made in 1935 following an outbreak of a febrile illness among abattoir (slaughterhouse) workers in Queensland, Australia Q fever (Query fever) is an infectious disease that spreads from animals to humans. Q fever is caused by a microbe called Coxiella burnetii. This microbe can survive for months and even years in dust or soil. Animals such as cattle, sheep, and goats can carry the Q fever microbe in tissues involved in birth--the uterus, placenta, and birth fluids

Q fever fact sheet - Fact sheets - NSW Healt

  1. Q Fever Revised 07/08/2018 Q fever is a zoonotic disease caused by Coxiella burnetii, a species of bacteria that is spread to animals by ixodid (hard) ticks. Bacteriology C. burnetii is a small Gram-negative obligate intracellular parasite. It cannot reproduce outside their host cell; it replicates in host monocytes and macrophages
  2. Q Fever. Q fever is a disease caused by a bacteria, Coxiella burnetti, which is carried by a number of animals, most commonly goats, cows, and sheep. Q fever is primarily spread by farm animals. While a number of animals are able to carry Q fever, it is most commonly seen in farm animals. Infected animals will pass the bacteria in urine, feces.
  3. Coxiella burnetii is the agent of Q fever, or query fever, a zoonosis first described in Australia in 1937. Since this first description, knowledge about this pathogen and its associated infections has increased dramatically. We review here all the progress made over the last 20 years on this topi
  4. Q fever results from infection by the bacterium, Coxiella burnetii, which can infect people who inhale aerosolized organisms, or by additional routes. Most human infections are associated with cattle, sheep and goats, and often occur when the animal gives birth. Symptoms of Q fever include fever, chills, night sweats, headache, fatigue and.
  5. Q fever is a zoonotic infection caused by the pathogen Coxiella burnetii, and patients can present with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations [ 1 ]. The designation Q fever (from Query) was made in 1935 following an outbreak of a febrile illness among abattoir (slaughterhouse) workers in Queensland, Australia
  6. Q fever is an infection with the pathogenic bacteria Coxiella burnetii. The disease was first described in Queensland, Australia; areas in which Q fever is known to be endemic include Australia, the western United States, Africa, England, and the Mediterranean countries. Animal infection is widesprea

Q fever is a reportable disease in Oklahoma. Q fever is a zoonotic disease caused by Coxiella burnetii, a species of bacteria that is distributed globally.Cattle, sheep, and goats are the primary reservoirs of C. burnetii.. Infection has been noted in a wide variety of other animals, including other species of livestock and in domesticated pets Query or Queensland fever (Q fever) is a bacterial infection affecting a variety of animal species as well as human beings. Q fever is caused by Coxiella burnetii , an obligate, intracellular, rickettsial organism that can survive in a dried condition for extended periods Q fever occurs worldwide. The bacteria that cause Q fever live mainly in sheep, cattle, and goats. Infected animals (which often do not show symptoms) shed the bacteria in their milk, urine, and stool (feces). People are infected when they inhale airborne droplets containing the bacteria or consume contaminated raw (unpasteurized) milk

Pneumonia is one manifestation of acute Q fever following infection with Coxiella burnetii. Fever, headache, and myalgia dominate the clinical picture of Q fever pneumonia. Cough is nonproductive and may be absent despite the presence of pneumonia. While in most instances pneumonia results in an ill The exact source of Q fever infection in humans is often unknown; however, sheep and goats are more frequently involved in human disease than other animal species, likely because of the higher level of shedding of the bacteria in birth fluids. (Rodolakis. 2006. Q fever, state of art: Epidemiology, diagnosis and prophylaxis.. Q fever is a zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii, a bacterium largely carried by ruminants and shed into milk, vaginal mucus, and feces. The main potential hazard to humans and animals is due to shedding of bacteria that can then persist in the environment and be aerosolized SUMMARY Coxiella burnetii is the agent of Q fever, or query fever, a zoonosis first described in Australia in 1937. Since this first description, knowledge about this pathogen and its associated infections has increased dramatically. We review here all the progress made over the last 20 years on this topic. C. burnetii is classically a strict intracellular, Gram-negative bacterium.

Atypical pneumonia - Q fever | Image | Radiopaedia

Q fever - Wikipedi

Q fever is an infectious disease of animals and humans caused by a species of bacteria called Coxiella burnetii. This organism is very durable †it can survive for months in the environment. Sheep, goats, and cattle can carry the organism. The bacteria can be shed by these animals in feces, urine, milk, and in the birthing fluids and. Background. Q fever is a zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii. In humans, although it has been predominantly considered an occupational hazard, in the last decades, Q fever outbreaks have also been reported in various countries, indicating its importance as an emerging public health threat. Domestic ruminants are considered as the most important sources of human infection Coxiella Burnetii, is a short, gram-negative rod that causes a disease called Q fever.. This bacteria is highly resistant to environmental stressors including high temperatures and ultraviolet light, and spreads to humans from mammals like cows, so Q fever is considered a zoonotic infection Q fever is caused by the bacteria Coxiella burnetii, which live in domestic animals such as cattle, sheep, goats, birds, and cats.Some wild animals and ticks also carry these bacteria.. You can get Q fever by drinking raw (unpasteurized) milk, or after breathing in dust or droplets in the air that are contaminated with infected animal feces, blood, or birth products

Q fever is a bacterial infection which spreads from animals; mainly cattle, sheep and goats. It can present in different ways, but often causes severe flu-like symptoms Q fever osteoarticular infection in children is an underestimated disease. We report 3 cases of Q fever osteomyelitis in children and review all cases reported in the literature through March 2018. A high index of suspicion is encouraged in cases of an unusual manifestation, prolonged course, relapsing symptoms, nonresolving or slowly resolving.

The bacteria that cause Q fever not only exist in a variety of domestic and wild animal species, but also in the general environment (e.g. dust and soil), which can also lead to infection and disease. Spread of infection from person-to-person is rare. Q fever can be treated with antibiotics Q fever is a bacterial infection. Animals, most typically sheep, goats, cattle and other livestock can infect humans. Symptoms include fever, muscle pain and a headache. Infection can be acute or.

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Q fever - NORD (National Organization for Rare Disorders

Q fever is an infection with the bacteria Coxiella burnetii. It is usually, but not always, caught by direct contact with farm animals, especially sheep, cattle and goats. Most cases are sporadic. The result was negative for Q fever, however, this serological study tested positive for psittacosis, which is another zoonotic bacterium, so we are attentive to the treatment of this patient. The inability to propagate obligate intracellular pathogens under axenic (host cell-free) culture conditions imposes severe experimental constraints that have negatively impacted progress in understanding pathogen virulence and disease mechanisms. Coxiella burnetii , the causative agent of human Q (Query) fever, is an obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen that replicates exclusively in an.

Q Fever Definition Q fever [1] is an illness caused by a type of bacteria, Coxiella burnetii, resulting in a fever and rash. Description C. burnetii lives in many different kinds of animals, including cattle, sheep, goats, ticks, cats, rabbits, birds, and dogs Clinical Information. Q fever, a rickettsial infection caused by Coxiella burnetii, has been recognized as a widely distributed zoonosis with the potential for causing both sporadic and epidemic disease.The resistance of C burnetii to heat, chemical agents, and desiccation allows the agent to survive for extended periods outside the host. The infection is spread by the inhalation of infected.

Background: Coxiella burnetii is an obligate bacterial pathogen that causes Q fever. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) commonly exists as a latent infection in healthy people. Co-infection with both pathogens is rare. Case presentation: We report an immunocompetent 53-year-old male farmer who presented with fulminant hepatic failure and acute renal failure Q fever is caused by the bacterium Coxiella burnetii. C. burnetii infects wild and domestic animals, and their ticks. Humans are mainly infected from cattle, sheep and goats. Who #. Q fever vaccine is recommended for adolescents aged ≥15 years and adults who are at risk of infection with C. burnetii. These include Q fever is an infectious disease of humans and animals caused by the bacterium Coxiella burnetii. The bacteria invade the cells of the body, filling the inside of infected cells with bacteria

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Q Fever: Causes, Symptoms, and Diagnosi

The standard treatment of Q fever-persistent focalized infection in adult patients is hydroxychloroquine and doxycycline; this regimen leads to fewer recurrences. Minimal treatment duration in persistent infections is 18 months; we have no evidence to determine the duration of doxycycline and hydroxychloroquine therapy [8,18,19] What is Q Fever? Q Fever is a disease caused by a bacteria, Coxiella burnetii. People who have frequent direct contact with livestock are at higher risk for getting the illness. How common is Q Fever infection? The disease was first recognized in Australia in 1937, but cases are now reported from many parts around the world. People with animal contact, veterinarians, mea

Epidemiology and Statistics Q Fever CD

  1. Q fever results from infection with Coxiella burnetii, a Proteobacteria that is mostly spread through aerosol transmission from infected animals and is found in most countries throughout the world. Q fever can present as an acute or more chronic disease. Persistent localized infections (eg, endocarditis, infection of aneurysms or vascular.
  2. Q fever is an infection caused by the bacterium Coxiella burnetii. Q fever is usually a mild disease with flu-like symptoms. Many people have no symptoms at all. In a small percentage of people, the infection can resurface years later. This more deadly form of Q fever can damage your heart, liver, brain and lungs
  3. Q Fever Center for Food Security and Public Health 2011 3 also cockroaches, beetles, flies, fleas, lice, mites). Over 40 tick species are naturally infected with C. burnetii, and transovarial (mother to offspring) and transstadial (between developmental life stages
  4. Q Fever. Q fever is a disease caused by the bacterium Coxiella burnetii.This bacterium naturally infects some animals, such as goats, sheep and cattle. About half of people who become infected develop symptoms, which can be mild to severe, and some may develop a chronic form of the disease
  5. SUMMARY Q fever is a zoonosis with a worldwide distribution with the exception of New Zealand. The disease is caused by Coxiella burnetii, a strictly intracellular, gram-negative bacterium. Many species of mammals, birds, and ticks are reservoirs of C. burnetii in nature. C. burnetii infection is most often latent in animals, with persistent shedding of bacteria into the environment
  6. ance. Small arrows indicate giant cells and epithelioid granuloma without necrosis
  7. Q fever is an infectious disease that is spread from animals to people by bacteria called Coxiella burnetii. Cattle, sheep and goats are the most common source of human infection, but other animals such as kangaroos, bandicoots, camels, dogs and cats can also cause infection

This study describes a Q fever outbreak in a herd of 77 Alpine goats which suffered a high rate of abortions (81% [58/72]) in January 2017 and presents the results of monitoring the contamination and viability of Coxiella burnetii in the farm environment several months after the outbreak. Over the course of 7 months, we studied bacterial shedding by 35 dams with abortions to monitor C. Query or Queensland Fever (Q fever) is a disease caused by the bacteria Coxiella burnetii. This bacteria naturally infects goats, sheep, and cattle. The infection is usually subclinical, but can cause abortions, still births, or birth of weak offspring. It is also a zoonosis, a disease of animals that can infect humans Figure 2. Imaging of the left ankle for a 2-year-old boy (case 2) with Q fever osteoarticular infection, Israel. A) A nuclear bone scan showing uptake in the talus (arrow). B-D) Magnetic resonance imaging sagittal T1 (B), sagittal T1 fat saturation + contrast (C), and sagittal short-TI inversion recovery (D) showing a lesion (white arrows) in. Chronic Q fever Infection that persists for more than 6 months. Potential fatal endocarditis might evolve months to years after acute infection, particularly in persons with underlying valvular disease. Infections of aneurysms and vascular prostheses have been reported. Immunocompromised persons are particularly susceptible

Information for Healthcare Providers Q Fever CD

  1. Is the Q fever vaccine effective? The Q fever vaccine (Q-VAX®) has been licensed for use in Australia since 1989 and has shown to be highly effective in preventing Q fever infection in humans. Since the introduction of the vaccination for high-risk occupations, the rates of Q fever infection have dropped markedly. The vaccine is made in Australia
  2. imum infective dose for a person is less than 10 organisms EXTREMELY PATHOGENIC organism! Q Fever infections in humans usually occur by what modes of transmission
  3. Although often underappreciated, a number of bacterial zoonoses are endemic in Africa. Of these, brucellosis, leptospirosis, Q fever, and rickettsioses are responsible for a substantial proportion of febrile illness among patients seeking hospital care. In this paper, we discuss the aetiology, epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of these bacterial zoonoses
  4. Kampschreur et al.'s use of the term chronic Q fever is misleading because it may lead to inadequate treatment of persistent focalized Coxiella burnetii infection(s). The obsolete term chronic Q fever should be abandoned to prevent confusion between endocarditis, vascular infections, osteoarticular infections, lymphadenitis, genital infection.
  5. Q fever has two major manifestations in man, acute and chronic infection. Acute Q fever has a variety of clinical presentations including self-limited febrile illness, pneumonia, hepatitis, meningoencephalitis, and pericarditis. Rarely it is a cause of constrictive pericarditis

Q-Feve

Q Fever Query Fever What is Q fever and what causes it? Q fever (the Q stands for query) is a disease caused by the bacterium, Coxiella burnetii (Cox-EE-ell-uh bur-net-EE-eye). The disease is found worldwide, except for New Zealand. It can cause reproduction problems in livestock and severe respiratory (lung) and liver disease in humans Q fever is a worldwide zoonotic disease caused by the bacteria Coxiella burnetii. Although a variety of animals may be infected, cattle, sheep, and goats are the primary reservoirs for C. burnetii. Infected animals can shed the organism in birthing fluids, placenta, milk, urine, and feces

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Q Fever - Queensland Healt

  1. Q fever is a disease caused by a bacteria called Cox i el l a burnet i i . Q fever is most often a disease of cattle, sheep, and goats, but other livestock, pets, and people can get Q fever. Confusion Symptoms can also include sore throat, chills, sweats, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, weight loss, stomach pain, and chest pain. Chronic Q fever.
  2. Q fever - including symptoms, treatment and prevention On this page. Q fever is an infection caused by Coxiella burnetii, a type of bacterium found worldwide except New Zealand.The infection is almost always related to direct or indirect contact with animals such as cattle, sheep or goats, although a wide range of animals including cats, dogs and kangaroos may carry the infection
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  5. Q Fever Infection 4 1

Q Fever (Coxiellosis) Animal Health Topics / School of

  1. Q Fever Fact Sheet What is Q fever? Q fever is a zoonotic disease caused by the bacteria Coxiella burnetii. The disease can occur in two forms: acute (short-term) and chronic (long-term). Q fever has been reported from most parts of the world. Although infection has been confirmed in many animal species, cattle, sheep and goats ar
  2. Q fever is an infectious disease that is spread from animals to people by a bacteria. Cattle, sheep and goats are the most common source of human infection, but other animals such as kangaroos, bandicoots, camels, dogs and cats can also cause infection
  3. Q FEVER. Q fever is a zoonotic bacterial infection that is worldwide in distribution. Coxiella burnetii is an obligate intracellular gram-negative bacterium that dwells in the phagolysosome of phagocytes and causes Q fever. It has the ability to survive for long periods of time outside its hosts

Chronic infection: Potentially fatal endocarditis may evolve months to years after acute infection, particularly in persons with underlying valvular disease. A chronic fatigue-like syndrome has been reported in some Q fever patients. Laboratory Criteria For Diagnosis Q fever is an ubiquitous zoonosis caused by an resistant intracellular bacterium, Coxiella burnetii . In certain areas, Q fever can be a severe public health problem, and awareness of the disease must be promoted worldwide. Nevertheless, knowledge of Coxiella burnetii remains limited to this day. Its resistant (intracellular and environmental) and infectious properties have been poorly. What is Q fever? Q fever is a disease caused by a bacterium known as Coxiella burnetii ( C. burnetii ). It is a zoonotic disease, which means that the bacteria naturally exist in animals, called the natural reservoir. Cattle, sheep, and goats are the main natural reservoirs of C. burnetii , but the bacteria have been noted in a variety of other. Q fever is an infection caused by a type of bacteria, which usually spreads to people from animals or their infected surroundings. For most people, it's a mild infection similar to the flu and can be treated easily. But for a few people, it can lead to serious health issues such as pneumonia and hepatitis Q fever is an infectious disease caused by a type of bacteria (Coxiella burnetii) that infects some livestock, companion animals and wildlife. It's a zoonosis, which means that infected animals can spread infection to people. Infected animals shed bacteria in their urine, faeces and milk, and in especially high numbers in birth products

This short report about Q Fever highlights the possibility of non-traditional exposures for this infection, that is, those not linked to contact with livestock or abattoirs. Two cases were likely to have been acquired through contact with kangaroos through their work on parklands where many kangaroos were resident. The cases reported mowing grass heavily contaminated with kangaroo faeces and. Coxiella burnetii is an obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen, and is the causative agent of Q fever. The genus Coxiella is morphologically similar to Rickettsia, but with a variety of genetic and physiological differences. C. burnetii is a small Gram-negative, coccobacillary bacterium that is highly resistant to environmental stresses such as high temperature, osmotic pressure, and.

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Q fever - OIE - World Organisation for Animal Healt

Q fever is a bacterial infection affecting mainly the lungs, liver, and heart. It is found around the world and is caused by the bacteria Coxiella burnetii. The bacteria affects sheep, goats, cattle, dogs, cats, birds, rodents, and ticks. Infected animals shed this bacteria in birth products, feces, milk, and urine. Humans usually get Q fever by breathing in contaminated droplets released by. Bacterial Zoonotic Disease in Cats. Q fever is a disease caused by an infection with Coxiella burnetii, a pathogenic bacterium that is structurally similar to the Rickettsia bacteria but genetically different.. A cat will most commonly become infected with the organism if it ingests infected bodily fluids (i.e., urine, feces, milk, discharges), tissues, or diseased carcasses (e.g., those from. Q FEVER What is Q fever? Q fever is an infection caused by the bacteria Coxiella burnetii (C. burnetii). Q fever is usually a mild disease with flu-like symptoms. Many people have no symptoms at all. In a small percentage of people, the infection can reoccur years later. How is Q fever spread? Q fever is spread to humans by animals, mos Q fever is a zoonotic bacterial infection caused by Coxiella burnetii,negative coccobacillus. a gram-The most common animal reservoirs include rumi-nates, such as cattle, sheep and goats, and is trans-mitted to humans by inhalation of contaminated aerosols.1 Diagnosing chronic Q fever relies on serology

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Q Fever (Coxiella burnetii) CD

Q fever is often confused with the flu because it can produce similar nonspecific symptoms like fatigue, fever, chills, muscle aches, cough, headaches, and night sweats. In fact, most mild to moderate cases of infection with Q fever may go undiagnosed and unrecognized by the individual Q fever is a zoonotic disease caused by the intracel-lular bacterium Coxiella burnetii. Persistent focal-ized Q fever infection in adults mainly manifests as endocarditis or as an endovascular infection. Cases of osteoarticular infection (OAI) have been scantly reported in the literature, rarely in children (1,2). Dis Q fever is a widespread zoonosis caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Coxiella burnetii. Aborting domestic ruminants are the main sources of human infection but the reservoir of infection is extremely wide. In humans, Q fever may occur as acute pneumonia, hepatitis or flu-like illness or may take a severe chronic form, characterized by.

Neurological Involvement in Acute Q Fever: A Report of 29

Symptoms of Q Fever. About 9 to 28 days after bacteria enter the body, symptoms begin suddenly. Some people have mild or no symptoms. Other people have flu-like symptoms. Symptoms of Q fever include fever, a severe headache, chills, extreme weakness, muscle aches, loss of appetite, and sweating, but no rash Q fever is a disease caused by the bacteria Coxiella burnetii which is found worldwide. The bacteria naturally infects some animals, such as goats, sheep and cattle. C. burnetii bacteria are found in the birth products (i.e. placenta, amniotic fluid), urine, feces, and milk of infected animals. The bacteria may be misused as a biological agent Q (Query) fever is caused by a type of bacteria found in domesticated and wild animals throughout the world. It is an important zoonosis - an animal infection that can cause illness in people, particularly those working with livestock. Q fever in animals Signs of disease are very uncommon but abortions (including large outbreaks) ma Q-Fever Herd Management Plan . The purpose of this herd plan is to outline appropriate actions and management practices to protect public health by reducing exposure to . Coxiella burnetii (the bacteria that causes Q-fever), to educate potentially exposed persons regarding Q-fever transmission, to limit the spread of . Coxiella burneti

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Q Fever ( C0034362 ) A bacterial infection caused by Coxiella burnetii. It is transmitted to humans by the inhalation of infected air particles or contact with fluids and feces of infected animals. Signs and symptoms include the abrupt onset of fever, headache, myalgias, and weakness no symptoms and infection may be discovered when the pre-screening test for vaccination returns a positive result; illness following infection that was self-diagnosed or diagnosed through a medical practitioner; If your experience with Q fever infection was not in Australia, unfortunately you are not eligible to participate Q fever results from infection by Coxiella burnetii. This organism is an obligate intracellular pathogen and has been traditionally placed in the family Rickettsiaceae; however, recent phylogenetic studies have demonstrated that C. burnetii is more closely related to Legionella, Francisella and Rickettsiella in the gamma subdivision of.